Collective action on corruption in Nigeria


That corruption is a destructive and complex practice is openly acknowledged in Nigeria, yet it remains ubiquitous in the functioning of society and economic life. Acts of diversion of federal and state revenue, business and investment capital, and foreign aid, as well as the personal incomes of Nigerian citizens, contribute to a hollowing out of the country’s public institutions and the degradation of basic services.

This report explores corruption in Nigeria as a collective practice – one that is primarily an aggregate of individual behaviours that are sustained by particular beliefs and expectations. Careful understanding of the factors that drive relevant behaviours should be a critical component of government actions to reduce corruption. Identifying the specific social drivers of specific collective practices is key to designing targeted and effective policy interventions to change those practices. This is because not all collective practices, regardless of how pernicious, are driven by a social norm

Read Full Report

Explore our reports

  • Reset
Advanced search